21 Ways To Use MBTI To Help You and Your Team

MBTIMBTI is an essential tool for you and your team.

As a leader, manager or HR Professional, one of your foundational strengths is the depth of your own self-awareness and awareness of how other’s tick.   You know the key to motivating people is being completely open and transparent and being able to be yourself, which in turn allows your team to follow suit.

One of the easiest and globally credible tools to develop self-awareness and understanding is Myers Briggs Personality Type Indicator (MBTI).   Carl Jung, the great psychologist developed a model of personality type which was later refined by the mother and daughter team, Isobel Myers and Katherine Briggs.

One of the principles of Jung’s model, “Psychological Types” developed in 1921, was each person has an innate urge to grow.  Part of our growing process is to learn how we individually operate, develop the parts of us that we need to learn more about, and learn about the people around us.

Understanding difference is a real people skill.  Differences occur through cultural, physical and psychological factors.  Mix this up with differing beliefs and temperaments, and no wonder managing and understanding people can be challenging.

In the UK, we have travelled some distance in identifying equality and cultural issues; the Equality Act 2010 takes that thinking even further.  Some organisations are still learning how to get to grips with difference, and some excel.  But I’m sure you will agree it is fair to say we always have room to improve.

When it comes to understanding psychological differences, we still have some way to go, but understanding such difference is important from a leadership or management perspective. Not only is it important;  it is relatively simple to grasp.

If you’ve experienced MBTI, you may have found learning about your own psychological type a key starting point for self-development.  Once you have an understanding of what makes you really tick, then your whole world will look different.  Not only will it lead to greater self-acceptance, but it will also help you accept and value the differences of others.

Many leaders,managers and HR professionals are familiar with and use Myers Briggs extensively so I will skip going into more detail.  If you haven’t come across the tool before, you can find out more about Myers Briggs on the link.

If you haven’t used Myers Briggs or you don’t feel you’ve fully realised the benefits from using the tool, here are 21 compelling reasons why you might want to look again.

Learning and understanding how each other tick can help to:

  1.  Avoid and resolve conflicts
  2.  Play to an individual’s strengths
  3.  Identify gaps in the team
  4.  Discover how your team style works best with customers
  5. Enable self-understanding and so reduce stress
  6. Help you learn to relax
  7. Aid career development
  8. Assist communication strategies
  9. Provide managers with the understanding to give effective feedback
  10. Inform personal development plan
  11. Work together more effectively
  12. Relate to each other with greater understanding
  13. Encourage true psychological diversity
  14. Support people through life transitions
  15. Inform your  own and others decision making
  16. Develop thinking skills
  17. Develop emotional intelligence
  18. Identify and develop strengths and weaknesses
  19. Develop leaders,  managers, teams and HR expertise
  20. Encourage team members to understand and appreciate different strengths
  21. Improve and change culture.

There are some circumstances where it can be dangerous to use Myers Briggs such as recruitment selection, judging performance or by making assumptions because of type indicators. The 8 elements of Myers Briggs can be used interchangeably, and people can be just as accomplished using their non-preferred type

If you have used personality type as part of your leadership, management, team development, or HR strategy;  I’d love to know how you got on and what you got out of your experience……or not!

 

Join us on this amazing journey!

This great article is from the our 6 months themed series based on the Centre for Creative Leaderships Report of 2013, in which they identified the 6 top challenges for leaders across the globe:   Don't Miss Out! Sign up here to be notified of subsequent issues and posts

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If you are a leader, you are continually developing and "Sharpening the Saw".  If you lead and manage teams, then you must read about our Inspirational New Leadership Programme.  Sign up now to find out more details when we launch in July 2014.  There is no obligation to undertake the programme, if you sign up today, you will simply be sent more information about the programme.  You can unsubscribe at any time!  Click below to register for further information.

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The 5 Step Blueprint Of Successful Organisational Change

the 5 step blueprint of organisational changeA Blueprint for Change

In my capacity as a Leadership and HR Consultant, I am mostly called in when a problem has been encountered or a change is needed.    Consultancy is of course about understanding the problem, so a solution can be found.  Because I understand that organisations have a personality just like people, the problem is always unique to that particular organisation.   And so of course it follows, the solution is unique.

Over the years, I have developed a paradoxically, simple approach, to what can be perceived as complex organisational change.   Using my expertise in Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP) and Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) coupled with systems thinking I help leaders get to the crux of the problem, and help them find organisational solutions quickly.

The 5 step process allows leaders to look at the change from a number of different perspectives; zoom in and zoom out; satisfy both intuitive/visionary and auditory/sensor preferences for taking in, assimilating and communicating information. It also encourages a holistic decision-making process which embraces heart and mind, or logic and feeling preferences.

The process in itself is a simple one, which helps maintain focus, although the dynamics within the process helps clarify complexities.  The 5 step process can be used in any organisation to solve problems or to instigate change.

The 5 Step Blueprint

1.   Where are you going?

 There are usually three basic directions, and it’s important to find out exactly where the organisation wants to go and how it wants to travel.  It is vital to determine at the very outset the clear drivers for change.

  • A moving towards or progression
  • A change of direction – a moving away from
  • An alignment to perform better

You may find that there is a combination of ways to move forward, but asking the question in this frame helps uncover what is motivating the change and develops the basis for the next step:

2.   At What level does the change need to be made?

There are 6 basic levels these are linked to 6 logical levels of change used in NLP:

  • The purpose or the “Why” of the organisation
  • The Identity or the organisational brand
  • The level of values, beliefs or concepts of the organisation
  • Knowledge, skills and competencies
  • Behaviours and culture
  • Environment

While this can take some time to establish it is essential appropriate time is taken to identify the starting level.   If your starting point is level one, then it is likely all remaining levels will be affected.  If you start at level 4, depending on what that change involves, will determine whether any other levels are affected.  The next step is:

3.   How does the change affect each part of the organisation?

 In addition to the logical levels above, change impacts each part of the whole.  A successful change process will anticipate those impacts, consult on the detail, and make necessary adjustments ensuring the change is integrated across each identified impact.  The level at which the change occurs will determine the scope and depth of the impact.  Some impacts might be:

  • Relationships
  • Interdependencies such as linked projects or schemes of work
  • Policies
  • Processes
  • External partnerships and stakeholders
  • Resources
  • Customers

 4.   How will you know that the change is successful?

 What exactly does success look like?  Ways to frame this question can be:

  • Will the organisation be more profitable/deliver better products and or services?
  • How often, and with what method will this improvement be measured?
  • How will the customers/stakeholders/partners respond to change?
  • How will employees respond, what will they be doing differently?
  • What will the organisation look and feel like?
  • How will existing targets and results change?

5.   How will the changes happen?

If the change is a one-off intervention, a programme or project approach may be beneficial.   If it is more significant, then you may want to build the change into the strategic plan and build in outcomes and ownership accordingly.   For a systematic approach, you need to consider the following elements to ensure success:

  • Who will own the change?
  • What is the governance around the change? (Where do accountabilities lie?)
  • How will the change be communicated?
  • Who will be consulted and when?
  • When will success be realised?

As you can see, change is only as complicated as you want it to be.  Keeping it simple may not satisfy the more theoretical and analytical minds around, but cutting out complexity is the surest way to get results more quickly and in a way in which everyone understands.

 

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This great article is from the our 6 months themed series based on the Centre for Creative Leaderships Report of 2013, in which they identified the 6 top challenges for leaders across the globe:   Don't Miss Out! Sign up here to be notified of subsequent issues and posts

121242255

If you are a leader, you are continually developing and "Sharpening the Saw".  If you lead and manage teams, then you must read about our Inspirational New Leadership Programme.  Sign up now to find out more details when we launch in July 2014.  There is no obligation to undertake the programme, if you sign up today, you will simply be sent more information about the programme.  You can unsubscribe at any time!  Click below to register for further information.

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12 Ways To Illuminate The Vision, While Dealing With The Realistic Stuff

134829714 (1)It’s challenging being realistic, when you are chasing a vision.

I write a lot about leadership  and how leaders can choose to see things from another perspective.  One of my inspirations is Carl Jung, especially his work on archetypes and dream analysis.  I see patterns and connections all around me, and if you know anything about Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) , you will understand it’s because I have a preference for intuition.

Being intuitive means I prefer using my imagination to find meaning.  I am fairly future focused, and a “towards” motivated person.   To those who don’t really know me, I can sound idealistic, looking towards a “happy ever after” future.   Self-awareness, however, keeps my feet on the ground mostly, although I do actually believe we can influence our future by what we think, feel and believe in the present, but that’s another story.

The other part of the MBTI Dichotomy around how we see things is the “sensing” type.  This type of person prefers to see the world through their 5 senses, and so can be fairly factual about what they are seeing.  They are “realistic” and prefer facts, and a pragmatic approach.  Sensors like to live in the present, and generally call upon past experiences to inform their decision making.

Intuition and Sensing are not labels

The problem with MBTI is that some people believe the word “type” traps people into one of the two parts of the dichotomy, and it becomes a label.  The truth is of course that we all take in information through our senses and our intuition in different quantities and in a variety of situations.  We just can’t be taking in information from both sources at once.  One day we could be realistic and down to earth, and the other might be finding joy in our dreams and vision.  Our type is determined by how we feel most comfortable, taking in information.

Idealism and Realism are necessary for real growth

I remember talking to a friend about my plans and aspirations, and how I wanted to change the world and make a real difference.  I rambled on for about 15 minutes, enthused by my theme and feeling passionate about what I wanted to do.  She listened attentively, smiling and nodding.  When I finished, before I got the last words out of my mouth she said “Lovely, but let’s get back down to earth now shall we?”

I laughed and nodded.  As you can see we are very different.   When I was younger and less experienced, I might have felt she had deliberately rained on my parade.  Older and wiser, I knew she was right.

In order to grow as leaders and effective people whether in a leadership role or not, it is healthy and right to be both idealistic and realistic.  If your preference is more prevalent either way  you might find it more difficult to get that balance right.

Leaders who get the balance right will take in information either through their own inner processes or through their team and:

  1. Use their imagination and aspirations to develop a clear vision, and convert to understandable outcomes
  2. Make connections; develop big picture and systems thinking to have an overview of how things will be.
  3. Harness the power of  strategic plans as well as action plans
  4. Assess the current situation or reality and understand where they are right now.
  5. Bridge the gap between current and future reality with communication, plans and milestones.
  6. Connect the past, present and future through storytelling and timelines
  7. Work towards outcomes through believable milestones, so both realistic,  and idealistic,  can buy –in
  8. Be tuned into and help solve day to day problems
  9. Support and give credit and reward for  “here and now” achievements
  10. Listen to and understand both intuitive and sensory input.
  11. Harness appropriate change strategies
  12. Realise they have to understand the “here and now”  to be able to turn idealistic dreams into reality

Do you get frustrated with others because they seem to live on a cloud?  Do you get disheartened because someone can’t seem to focus on anything beyond tomorrow?

 

Join us on this amazing journey!

This great article is from the our 6 months themed series based on the Centre for Creative Leaderships Report of 2013, in which they identified the 6 top challenges for leaders across the globe:   Don't Miss Out! Sign up here to be notified of subsequent issues and posts

121242255

If you are a leader, you are continually developing and "Sharpening the Saw".  If you lead and manage teams, then you must read about our Inspirational New Leadership Programme.  Sign up now to find out more details when we launch in July 2014.  There is no obligation to undertake the programme, if you sign up today, you will simply be sent more information about the programme.  You can unsubscribe at any time!  Click below to register for further information.

Inspirational New Leadership

   

21 Compelling Reasons To Get To Know Yourself And Your Team

As a leader, manager or HR Professional, one of your foundational strengths is the depth of your own self-awareness and awareness of how other’s tick.   You know the key to motivating people is being completely open and transparent and being able to be yourself, which in turn allows your team to follow suit.

One of the easiest and globally credible tools to develop self-awareness and understanding is Myers Briggs Personality Type Indicator (MBTI).   Carl Jung, the great psychologist developed a model of personality type which was later refined by the mother and daughter team, Isobel Myers and Katherine Briggs.

One of the principles of Jung’s model, “Psychological Types” developed in 1921, was each person has an innate urge to grow.  Part of our growing process is to learn how we individually operate, develop the parts of us that we need to learn more about, and learn about the people around us.

Understanding difference is a real people skill.  Differences occur through cultural, physical and psychological factors.  Mix this up with differing beliefs and temperaments, and no wonder managing and understanding people can be challenging.

In the UK, we have travelled some distance in identifying equality and cultural issues; the Equality Act 2010 takes that thinking even further.  Some organisations are still learning how to get to grips with difference, and some excel.  But I’m sure you will agree it is fair to say we always have room to improve.

When it comes to understanding psychological differences, we still have some way to go, but understanding such difference is important from a leadership or management perspective. Not only is it important;  it is relatively simple to grasp.

If you’ve experienced MBTI, you may have found learning about your own psychological type a key starting point for self-development.  Once you have an understanding of what makes you really tick, then your whole world will look different.  Not only will it lead to greater self-acceptance, but it will also help you accept and value the differences of others.

Many leaders,managers and HR professionals are familiar with and use Myers Briggs extensively so I will skip going into more detail.  If you haven’t come across the tool before, you can find out more about Myers Briggs on the link.

If you haven’t used Myers Briggs or you don’t feel you’ve fully realised the benefits from using the tool, here are 21 compelling reasons why you might want to look again.

Learning and understanding how each other tick can help to:

  1.  Avoid and resolve conflicts
  2.  Play to an individual’s strengths
  3.  Identify gaps in the team
  4.  Discover how your team style works best with customers
  5. Enable self-understanding and so reduce stress
  6. Help you learn to relax
  7. Aid career development
  8. Assist communication strategies
  9. Provide managers with the understanding to give effective feedback
  10. Inform personal development plan
  11. Work together more effectively
  12. Relate to each other with greater understanding
  13. Encourage true psychological diversity
  14. Support people through life transitions
  15. Inform your  own and others decision making
  16. Develop thinking skills
  17. Develop emotional intelligence
  18. Identify and develop strengths and weaknesses
  19. Develop leaders,  managers, teams and HR expertise
  20. Encourage team members to understand and appreciate different strengths
  21. Improve and change culture.

There are some circumstances where it can be dangerous to use Myers Briggs such as recruitment selection, judging performance or by making assumptions because of type indicators. The 8 elements of Myers Briggs can be used interchangeably, and people can be just as accomplished using their non-preferred type

If you have used personality type as part of your leadership, management, team development, or HR strategy;  I’d love to know how you got on and what you got out of your experience……or not!

 

 

Join us on this amazing journey!

This great article is from the our 6 months themed series based on the Centre for Creative Leaderships Report of 2013, in which they identified the 6 top challenges for leaders across the globe:   Don't Miss Out! Sign up here to be notified of subsequent issues and posts

121242255

If you are a leader, you are continually developing and "Sharpening the Saw".  If you lead and manage teams, then you must read about our Inspirational New Leadership Programme.  Sign up now to find out more details when we launch in July 2014.  There is no obligation to undertake the programme, if you sign up today, you will simply be sent more information about the programme.  You can unsubscribe at any time!  Click below to register for further information.

Inspirational New Leadership

   

Managing Performance Is An Emotional Business – Isn’t It? – Emotional Intelligence

emotional intelligenceGreat Leaders Have Emotional Intelligence:

One of the most important but underrated skills leaders and managers need to be able to manage performance well is emotional intelligence.  If you are predominately a thinking leader then you may well be sceptical about emotional intelligence, but please bear with me.

Three categories of performance management

If you are like most organisations the hierarchy of performance management falls into three broad categories:

People who:

a)      Underperform

b)      Perform averagely/competently

c)      Perform over and above requirements

A number of organisations give more focus to under-performance and over-performance.  Why?  Because unchecked under-performance permeates the rest of the organisation and multiplies as it impacts on every member of the team.  Over-performance cries out to be recognised.  Quite often organisations depend on and excel because of star performers, and with a mixture of gratitude and desire to keep performance at that level, reward systems are introduced.

The Employment Practices report by Xperthr which can be found here shows for nearly 70% of people surveyed, action for poor performance was taken for less than 5% of employees.   Although I don’t particularly subscribe to bell curve comparisons, some latest models advocate average rates of over-performance equate to some 16% of total workforce.  If you add both together then you are talking about 21% of your employees.   If you do the maths, there is a possibility that up to 79% of your employees are average or competent performers.

So yes, the figures are fairly subjective, but my guess is unless you are a top performer in your industry it’s likely that the majority of your people fall under the “average or competent performance” criteria.

As a performance manager you have distinct functions for each category of performer.  And you need to performance manage all of your people, not just extreme performers.   You will be more effective in achieving results if you use emotional intelligence techniques to enhance your management of each category.

Under-performance and emotional intelligence

Your aim is to either get your employee to perform to standard or to leave the organisation.  Whilst being very clear about your expectations in performing to standard; in order to avoid conflict and be effective, you need to be able to display at least two emotional skills:

a)      Detachment from the outcome.  In order to give your employee the best chance, you need to distance yourself from pre-empting the result.  If you do this, your employee will be able to self-select whether they are able to raise their game, or they will voluntarily leave as they know themselves they are in the wrong job.

b)      Put aside your feelings.  Quite often, poor performers cause you headaches and it’s common to assume an attitude about them.  Or conversely you worry about the consequences for them and this inhibits being assertive.  It is understandable, because under-performers increase stress levels, and utilise effort which could be directed elsewhere.  The majority of people who under-perform are just as horrified about the situation as you.  By putting aside your feelings and being impersonal and practical, you are in a position to listen and make sound win/win decisions.

Average performance and emotional intelligence

Managing is a stressful business and you have a multitude of tasks and issues to deal with; many decisions to make, planning to be done, well you don’t need me to tell you how busy it is.  The problem is, the majority of your people who don’t cause you problems, and get the work done are working in their comfort zone and it’s hard to find the time to raise the bar for them.  Your main task for this category is to use their talent, time and goodwill to drive up performance.   You can do this in a number of ways, but setting stretching objectives designed to drive up pockets of performance across the board is the key.  The EI skills needed to do this are:

a)      Put aside your limiting beliefs about your employees.  The biggest mistake is holding the belief that people have reached a limit of capability and capacity.  Often leaders make assumptions that people can’t or won’t do better.   But more often than not, if you genuinely believe in someone, and give them the right encouragement and support, they will rise to the challenge.

b)      Be patient about results.  We are creatures of habits.  When you raise expectations of your people, then it will take them a little while to change the way they have always done things.  If you are patient and encouraging and restate your belief in their ability to do better they will eventually get there and your business will benefit from all of that renewed effort.

Over-performance and emotional intelligence

I don’t know about you, but I have often nearly been on my knees with gratitude when self-starters have driven through tricky situations, or taken initiative and made my life easier, gotten great results and done a great job.  Given the choice wouldn’t we all like to have these people in our midst?  But while you need to hold the vibe of gratitude you need to remember your function for these people, and in this situation it is two-fold.  You need to reward great performance and you need to help these great performers get where they need to be. Hopefully that will be in a career in your company, but if it isn’t you still need to help them.  In order to achieve this effectively there are two attitudes you must hold and it takes some emotional maturity to achieve:

a)     Letting go.  Your star performers will more than likely move on.  One of the most emotionally intelligent stances you can achieve is recognising when someone you manage will likely progress their career further than yours.  Even trickier is realising that your star performer will move onto another business.  It’s easy to fall into the trap of limiting the help you give, or the development you make available to star performers, because they may leave taking all your investment with them.  But investment is never lost.  They will appreciate and give you accolades for the helping hand they received and your reputation as an employer of choice will grow.

b)     Understand each has their own path and guidance to follow.  I remember losing a star performer and thinking they were making a big mistake.  I also thought they were leaving for the wrong reasons.  I would like to say I used my emotional intelligence and gave them my blessing to leave, but I didn’t. I told them I thought they were making a mistake.  No much emotional intelligence there!  Did they change their mind? No.  They left and although a rocky road; they went on to even bigger and better things and leveraged change they might not have been able to had they stayed working for my company.  Respecting others’ own choices is key to great performance management, and in the long run your company will benefit, because your employees will know you have their best interests at heart.

 

 

 

Join us on this amazing journey!

This great article is from the our 6 months themed series based on the Centre for Creative Leaderships Report of 2013, in which they identified the 6 top challenges for leaders across the globe:   Don't Miss Out! Sign up here to be notified of subsequent issues and posts

121242255

If you are a leader, you are continually developing and "Sharpening the Saw".  If you lead and manage teams, then you must read about our Inspirational New Leadership Programme.  Sign up now to find out more details when we launch in July 2014.  There is no obligation to undertake the programme, if you sign up today, you will simply be sent more information about the programme.  You can unsubscribe at any time!  Click below to register for further information.

Inspirational New Leadership